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BizReport : Social Marketing : June 25, 2014


Teens are not fleeing Facebook

That Facebook is being deserted by teens in favor of alternative social networks has long been touted online. However, recent research in the U.S. by Forrester shows that teens remain the dominant demographic on the social network.

by Helen Leggatt

A survey of youngsters aged between 12 and 17 shows that Facebook continues to be a social network that teens regularly use. Almost 80% said they still use Facebook and are more active on it than any other including Pinterest and Twitter.

There's no escaping the fact that there has been some decrease in the number of teens using Facebook - and Forrester acknowledges this fact - but reports of a mass exodus have been widely misreported says Forrester researcher Nate Elliott in a recent blog post.

"Ivy League researchers have forecast that the service will be all but dead by 2017; President Obama recently claimed that young people "don't use Facebook anymore"; and when comScore recently reported that fewer college students were using Facebook, media outlets ran stories on the "social platforms college kids now prefer"", writes Elliott.

The reality is that Facebook is still more popular among teens than any other social network. Just 20% of teens are on WhatsApp and 40% on Snapchat. Furthermore, sites such as Pinterest, Tumblr and Vine all have about 30% teen adoption.

While YouTube has the highest teen adoption at over 80%, Facebook still has more "hyperusers", defined as the portion of monthly visitors who are there "all the time".

Image via Shutterstock

Tags: research, social media, social network, teen preference, U.S.










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